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High Hopes

by Guy Combes

This small herd of Rothschild giraffe is making its way across the Great Rift Valley as pelicans from Lake Elmenteita pass overhead. Less than 700 of the Rothschild giraffe are thought to remain in existence, possibly only 500. Their habitat is severely depleted and this giraffe subspecies can only be found in the wild in areas of Murchison Falls National Park in Uganda, Nakuru National Park in Kenya and Soysambu Conservancy, also in Kenya. “At Soysambu we have a population of 60 that are breeding very successfully,” says artist Guy Combes. The Soysambu Conservancy is a non-profit organization whose goal is to preserve Africa’s Great Rift Valley ecosystem for the benefit of future generations of both man and animal.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 50 s/n.
19"w x 24"h.
$450
Ask About Availability


Also by Guy Combes


A Shaky Start

by Guy Combes
Canvas

   

 



Coming Home

by Rod Frederick

The inspiration for this painting came from the early successes in re-populating the West Coast with the bald eagle, our national symbol that had landed on the endangered species list in 1967. Loss of habitat, hunting and the suspected effects of the insecticide DDT on eagle fertility contributed to their steep decline throughout the 19th century. In 2007, the Interior Department took the eagle off the Endangered Species list but the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act continues to make it illegal to take, sell, trade or collect eagles or eagle parts.

“It’s one of my favorite subjects to paint,” says Rod Frederick. “I see them all the time here in the Cascades.” Over two thirds of the world’s bald eagle population has “come home” to breed and thrive in Alaska and British Columbia, largely due to the undeveloped land and the salmon fisheries.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
17"w x 21"h.
$395
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Also by Rod Frederick


Moonlighting

by Rod Frederick
Canvas

   



Midday Siesta

by Simon Combes

Lions are not preyed upon by any other animal which probably explains their arrogance and any disregard for other species. Apparently, this also explains why they have no stripes or spots—no need for camouflage—although they do have spots when they are young. Resting during the day, they display strong family ties with much mutual rubbing, licking and body contact. Their uninterrupted life of sleeping, eating and breeding would suggest a population explosion but the illusion of peaceful cooperation disappears a soon as food is available. Then, survival of the fittest is the maxim. Recent apparent soul-mates spit and snarl and swipe at each other and any lion not in top condition will go hungry without pricking the conscience of its fellow.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 75 s/n.
28"w x 19"h.
$625
Ask About Availability


Also by Simon Combes


Arrogance

by Simon Combes
Canvas

   



   
   

 

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