Greenwich Workshop



Subject Artist Price Books My Gallery Contact Join Email List About Printing Service

Join Our Email List Catalogue My Gallery Books Fine Art Categories catalogue homepage greenwich workshop homepage
Home > Catalogue > February 2009
Thumbnail View Home Next February 2009

Click on any item/page for more details.

To Order:
Click on any of the Ask About Availability links throughout the catalogue to send your Preferred Dealer a request to order.

Quick Links:
Catalogue Archive
Request a Catalogue

 




Crow Indian with Peace Pipe

by James Bama

James Bama met Henry Bright Wings during a medicine ceremony performed in the tepee of a Crow medicine man in Wyola, Montana. He was then 68. Bama liked his classic face, which he thought would have been appropriate on a buffalo nickel. When Bright Wings visited Old Trail Town in Cody, Wyoming several years later, Bama dressed him in historical costume including a pre-1900 headdress and a very old buffalo robe from the Old Trail Town Museum in Cody.

In earlier times the right to wear a headdress had to be earned, usually in battle. Today even women and children sometimes wear a showy nontraditional war bonnet for pow-wow dance parades and celebrations. Many men feel that their age is entitlement enough, but others will not wear a headdress because they do not consider it their proper. Bama met a Pine Ridge Reservation Indian who would not pose in a headdress even though he was 45 years old and certainly looked venerable enough.

During the Indian Wars of the post-Civil War years, Bright Wings’ people, the Crows, frequently allied themselves with the military against such traditional enemies as the Sioux and the Cheyenne. Crow scouts rode to their deaths with Custer.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:

limited to 75 s/n.
21"w x 17"h.
$595
Ask About Availability


Also by James Bama

The Pawnee

by James Bama
Canvas
   

 




The Agile Bark Canoe
by John Buxton

The Native People of the Eastern Woodlands built two types of canoes: dug-outs, fashioned from tree trunks, and more lightweight canoes made of bark, preferably birch since it was easier to form. The men in The Agile Bark Canoe are in hunting canoes of a style attributed to the Passamaquoddy―but perhaps these Indians traded for them, as was done frequently. They were as light as an autumn leaf upon water, with the ability to navigate rivers, shallow streams, marshes and moderate rapids. Being extremely light enabled easy portage between waterways and yet they were capable of carrying heavy loads. A canoe this size (12 feet long by 30 inches wide at its center) could be lifted with one hand and was very stable when fully loaded. The bark canoe was fast and infinitely more versatile than any small craft of the European settlers.

Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 50 s/n.
25"w x 25"h.
$695
Ask About Availability

Arriving March 2009

 

 

 

Become a Dealer Books YouTube Pinterest Instagram Twitter Facebook Privacy Policy Shows and Events About Us Licensing Art Registration and Sign In Legal Find a Dealer Marketing Book Media Resources Frequently Asked Questions Email Customer Service 203.881.7724 Video Type Price Artist Subject New Releases GreenwichWorkshop.com